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A lot of women who struggle with BV or Yeast infections feel poorly understood by their doctors and left behind by the health care system. Recurrent infections are frustrating, can trigger unhappiness and problems with intimacy, and just make for a real drag in general. By banishing bad bacteria and busting biofilms, you’ll  give the good guys (lactobacillus) a chance to bring your vagina back to its healthy acidic state. Think of it as kissing your headache (and vagina ache) goodbye.

Boric acid is a white powder derived from boron and water. It has antibiotic, anti-viral AND anti-fungal properties so it works against fungal and bacterial infections.


Boric acid is a major player in our treatment game. Recommended by gynecologists, it’s a clinically proven, research-backed treatment for even the most stubborn recurrent yeast infections. When used as a vaginal suppository, it begins to work right away to restore and support your normal vaginal pH, and relieve irritating vaginal symptoms.

Boric acid does the work of an antibacterial and antifungal. Amazing, right? Now, get this; it not only works against Candida albicans, it has your back when you’re facing Candida glabrata, a strain responsible for resistant yeast infections and infections that don’t respond to other treatments. Boric acid is also effective against trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted infection.

There are relatively few safe and effective alternatives to treating vaginal infections on the market, and continuously using antibiotics and antifungals are not great for your gut or your health (Google it!). Boric acid takes the guesswork out of treating common vaginal infections because it can be used safely to treat Yeast, BV, pH imbalance, and even vaginal odour. If you’re feeling stress from any of the above, that’s where we come in.

Vaginal health and intimate hygiene are easy with our capsules, which are physician-recommended and designed to get you back to feeling go-about-your-day confident.

The vagina is a delicate ecosystem that’s normally home to a finely tuned balance of good and bad bacteria. If the bad bacteria present in the vagina becomes unbalanced, it can lead to infection such as bacterial vaginosis or yeast, and inflammation. Stress, diet, scented bath products, menstrual cycles, and even sex can have an effect on the delicate pH balance in your vagina. These culprits can also play a role in causing vaginitis, and they can contribute to a whole range of symptoms including discharge, odor, itching, burning, rawness, stinging, irritation, redness, and swelling. Moral of the story, maintaining balance is key.

Vaginas aren’t meant to smell like roses. Vaginas smell like vaginas—musky, metallic, or maybe like nothing at all—and that’s perfectly okay. It’s completely normal to have your own unique scent down there. Unless things start to smell distinctly fishy. That’s when something’s up.

What you’re dealing with is called bacterial vaginosis, or “BV” for short. If you’re not familiar, BV happens when an overgrowth of the wrong bacteria causes an imbalance of the microbes normally present in your vagina, which throws off your natural pH. This leads to an infection and you guessed it, the smell you’re dealing with.

With BV, you experience any of the following:

  • Strong fishy odour
  • Thin, milky grey or white discharge
  • Mild itching or irritation
  • Burning when you pee

BV can also be asymptomatic, which means that you might not show any of these symptoms at all.

  • Douching
  • Using scented pads or tampons
  • Washing with scented body wash or soap
  • Changes in hormones
  • Sexual activity, especially frequent intercourse or sex with new/multiple partners
  • Menstruation
  • Menopause

Bacterial vaginosis is the most common cause of vaginal infection in women between ages 15 and 45-years-old and is responsible for 40% to 50% of clinical cases. Usually, BV doesn’t cause any serious health problems but can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (in which case, contact your doctor ASAP). Take note, BV often persists after treatment and antibiotics used to treat BV can sometimes trigger a Yeast infection.

Candida is a type of yeast that naturally occurs in small amounts in the vagina, as well as other places on and in the body. Most vaginal yeast infections are caused by the organism Candida albicans. Your vagina naturally contains a balanced mix of Candida and bacteria, with certain good bacteria, or lactobacillus, acting to prevent the overgrowth of Candida.

Yeast can get out of control when your immune system is weak or when lactobacillus, that good bacteria, can’t keep it at bay. As the healthy yeast that normally lives in your vagina grows out of control, a fungal infection occurs that causes irritation, discharge, and itchiness of the vagina and the vulva.

  • Intense itchiness
  • Stinging or burning of the vulva and vagina
  • Pain during urination
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Some women experience a thick white and clumpy vaginal discharge, while others report a watery discharge
  • Burning or redness in the vagina and vulva
  • Swelling of the labia and vulva

With treatment, most uncomplicated Yeast infections last from three to seven days, while others can take up to two weeks to completely resolve.

  • Fatigue/not getting enough sleep
  • Antibiotics
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Changes in hormones
  • Pregnancy
  • Use of perfumed soap and bath products
  • Diabetes

Other things that can cause vaginal and vulvar irritation:

  • Hot or humid weather
  • Use of panty liners on a regular basis
  • Tight or non-breathable clothing
  • Wearing a wet bathing suit or damp workout apparel for too long
High estrogen levels associated with Yeast infections rise most commonly during pregnancy. This change, especially when factored with lifestyle changes like sleep and diet, can weaken the immune system and stimulate the growth of yeast.

Hormonal changes can throw off the delicate balance between bacteria and yeast. With your body’s drop in estrogen, the skin of your vulva and vagina becomes thin and easily irritated. The pH of your vagina can also change due to your body’s shift in hormones, making infections more likely.

Many women find that Yeast infections are triggered by the onset of menstruation or during a certain phase of their menstrual cycle when hormone levels spike or drop. Hormonal fluctuations can cause a change in vaginal pH, which can trigger an overgrowth of yeast.

Recent studies show a possible connection between women with type 2 diabetes and increased vaginal Yeast infections. Because yeast feeds on glucose, an increase in blood sugar levels could also cause an increase in the vaginal and vulvar region.

Women been diagnosed with HIV may experience more Yeast infections due to a weakened immune system.

Think you’re alone in the battle against Yeast infections? Think again. Approximately 75% of women experience at least one in their lifetime. Many others suffer recurrent infections brought on by stress, their menstrual cycle, intercourse, or dietary changes.

If you’re in the camp that experiences recurring episodes, you might want to kick conventional treatments. Those creams and pills usually treat only yeast or bacteria and can create some pretty unpleasant side effects when used repeatedly. Ready to consider an alternative approach? That’s right, ladies. We’re talkin’ about boric acid.

Insert 1 capsule high into the vagina at bedtime for 14 days, for relief from recurrent infections such as yeast infections or bacterial vaginosis.  Use for a full course of treatment (14 days), or as needed after sex, or when things feel a little “off” around that time of the month. Some discharge as the capsule dissolves is normal. Store in a cool, dry place.

Warning: Keep out of reach of children. Avoid sexual intercourse during treatment. For vaginal use only.  Do not consume orally.

When used as a vaginal suppository, boric acid may occasionally cause irritation and a watery discharge. Consult a health care provider if symptoms persist or worsen. Consult with a health care practitioner prior to use in the case of estrogen-dependent cancer.

Boric acid suppositories should not be used during pregnancy or breastfeeding unless recommended by a physician. Do not use if you have an immune-compromised condition (e.g. AIDS, lymphoma, or you are undergoing long-term corticosteroid treatment).

Discontinue use and consult a healthcare practitioner if you experience vaginal pain, irritation, burning, or foul-smelling vaginal discharge.

This site is not intended to provide diagnosis or medical advice. Information and other content provided are intended for informational purposes only.

Please consult with a healthcare professional regarding any medical or health related diagnosis or treatment options. Products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. Individual results may vary.